I'm a SUPERHOTFEMALE

skunkandburningtires:

James Lopez is a veteran Disney animator (The Lion King, Pocahontas, Paperman) who is trying to raise funding for his primarily hand-drawn short film, Hullabaloo, with hopes of eventually finding a studio to fund a full-length version.

From the film’s IndieGo page:

Hullabaloo is the story of Veronica Daring, a brilliant young scientist who returns home from an elite finishing school to find her father—the eccentric inventor Jonathan Daring—missing without a trace! The only clue left behind points Veronica toward Daring Adventures, an abandoned amusement park used by her father to test his fantastical steam-powered inventions. There she discovers a strange girl named Jules, a fellow inventor who agrees to help Veronica in locating her missing father and discovering the secrets of his work.

In addition to helping save 2D animation, Hullabaloo aims to encourage girls to explore science and adventure. The film’s two protagonists are both young women and both scientists who use their intellect, wits, and courage to fight greed and corruption. We hope that Veronica Daring and her friend Jules will serve as positive role models for girls of all ages and encourage them to get excited about science, engineering, and sci-fi.

To see some footage and a short video pitch from Lopez, click here.

(via lauraroslins)

Anonymous: The doctor will never be a woman. There are plenty of women in the show that are admirable role models. I think you're just full ofsh it. Stop pushing your american views onto Doctor Who, a BRITISH show, with BRITISH values. It's unbelievable how obnoxious and hypocritical feminists are, especially you third-wave feminists. Always spouting "equal rights" but, "Can't hit me, cause I'm a girl!" You probably won't respond to this because you know I'm right and the whovianfeminism stance is weak.

markdoesstuff:

whovianfeminism:

This was so beautiful that I had to put it up on my wall and examine it as if it were an exquisite piece of art. 

image

"Manpain" by Anonymous

Above we have a quintessential example of early 21st Century prose by an aggrieved man. The author of this piece is unknown, but we can surmise by his inability to properly say “shit” to a woman and his assurance that he likes “admirable” female characters that he is most likely a “Nice Guy.”

The anonymous author employs deliberate obtuseness in order to provoke a reaction from his audience. Notice how he pretends no British individual supports the idea of a woman portraying the Doctor, despite clear evidence to the contrary, even amongst actors who have portrayed the titular character on the show. Then there is the stunning self-centeredness regarding his perception of third wave feminism; he is only interested in equality it grants him the “right” to hit the women whose arguments make him so incoherently angry that he is unable to rationally reply.

His final challenge attempts to trap the reader. Do we respond and grant him the audience and validation he so desperately seeks, or do we ignore him and let him believe he has won? But perhaps we have a third option: to turn the focus back on him and examine how his comments display his deep insecurity in his own sense of masculinity, something he feels can only be reclaimed by challenging a girl on the internet to a fight and preemptively declaring victory because he fears he cannot engage with her on an intellectual level.

a work of goddamn art oh my god

some female artists + feminism

(Source: swlft, via firefloxes)

tedbunny:

Women’s Strike for Equality in New York around Fifth Avenue August 26, 1970

tedbunny:

Women’s Strike for Equality in New York around Fifth Avenue August 26, 1970

(via third-eyes)

pixography:

Salvador Dali ~ “La Vierge et le Rhinoceros”, 1975

Rendered with a graphic simplicity and bold colours, this work draws together two familiar subjects which appear repeatedly within Dalí’s pictorial landscape – the rhinoceros and the virgin. The rhinoceros, and in particular its horn, held a specific emotional and symbolic significance for Dalí.  He conceptualised it as a symbol of chastity through its association with that of the unicorn.
‘The rhino’s horn is indeed the legendary unicorn horn, symbol of chastity. The young lady may choose to lie on it or to morally play with it; as it was usual in courtesan love epochs’, Dali said. <source>

pixography:

Salvador Dali ~ “La Vierge et le Rhinoceros”, 1975

Rendered with a graphic simplicity and bold colours, this work draws together two familiar subjects which appear repeatedly within Dalí’s pictorial landscape – the rhinoceros and the virgin. The rhinoceros, and in particular its horn, held a specific emotional and symbolic significance for Dalí.  He conceptualised it as a symbol of chastity through its association with that of the unicorn.

‘The rhino’s horn is indeed the legendary unicorn horn, symbol of chastity. The young lady may choose to lie on it or to morally play with it; as it was usual in courtesan love epochs’, Dali said. <source>

(via herpicusderpicus)

Bromeo, oh Bromeo
I love you.. No homeo”
– Every Bro Ever (via frecklesandstitches)

(via unculturedchildren)

cellar door by coryjohnny for tumblr.